random thoughts

~ Parents, people do not think your child is cute when you give them the mini-shopping cart at Publix and let them wreak havoc down the aisles. Please keep an eye on them and the other shoppers around you.

~ If you’re trying to sell someone essential oils, skincare, etc., and they say no, please just respect that and don’t continue to email/text/DM. I know that the motivational speakers at your conferences tell you otherwise, but it really just puts people – often your friends – in a very uncomfortable position. Some of us don’t like saying “PLEASE DON’T EVER ASK ME THAT AGAIN!”

~ Spring has sprung here, and the dogwood trees in snow white bloom remain my favorite.

~ The canopy roads in these parts are spectacularly green:

canopy-road

~ Roses are blooming in Thomasville, the City of Roses:

mar-rose

~ I’ve got 5 knitting projects in various stages of completion, and I have 4 books in progress. It’s time to power through some of these and move on.

~ By the time this post appears, I’ll likely have finished Sous Chef: 24 Hours on the Line, and it’s really good. I love reading about people who pursue a vocation with excellence, and this one fits the bill.

Happy Thursday y’all,

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“I tend to think of it as an escape into reality.”

death-comesFrom Death Comes For the Deconstructionist by Daniel Taylor:

And so I do what I often do in this situation. I decide to read. Books were an early lifeline, and I turn to them regularly with a certain desperate hopefulness. People talk about reading as an escape from reality—I tend to think of it as an escape into reality. Books aren’t an escape from trouble. There’s more trouble in novels—and most other books—than anywhere else. Books aren’t even an escape from your own particular troubles, because a good book always makes you think about your own life while it pretends to distract you from it. It’s just that books suggest the possibility that trouble can be survived, if you know what I mean. Or at least named. Books are more real for me than the rest of my life because they light up more parts of me than the rest of my life ever has.

 

2018 reading

This year – the year that I turn 50 – my goal is to read 50 books, mostly from my own shelves. Here’s how it’s going so far:

JANUARY

  1. This Must Be the Place: A Novel – Maggie O’Farrell
  2. Young Jane Young – Gabrielle Zevin
  3. Delores Claiborne – Stephen King
  4. How Dante Can Save Your Life: The Life-Changing Wisdom of History’s Greatest Poem – Rod Dreher
  5. The Temptation of Adam – Dave Connis

FEBRUARY

  1. Death Comes for the Deconstructionist– Daniel Taylor
  2. In Fairleigh Field – Rhys Bowen
  3. The Whole30 Day By Day – Melissa Hartwig
  4. Not Perfect – Elizabeth LaBan
  5. Never Let Me Go – Kazuo Ishiguro

MARCH

  1. Fates and Furies – Lauren Groff
  2. Sous Chef: 24 Hours on the Line – Michael Gibney

APRIL

  1. My Berlin Kitchen: Adventures in Love & Life – Luisa Weiss
  2. Better Than Before: What I Learned About Making and Breaking Habits– Gretchen Rubin

woah

three-booksMy reading year has started out with a bang – three excellent novels:

All were well-told stories of complicated (aren’t we all?) people and relationships. All three were filled with dead-on observations of human behavior and familiar situations. All had satisfying endings that weren’t tied up in that trite happily-ever-after way that gets on my nerves. I’ve read Stephen King (Misery and 11/22/63) and Gabrielle Zevin (The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry) before, but this was my first taste of Maggie O’Farrell’s work. I will be seeking out more.

I’m enjoying three other books (two non-fiction and another novel), and if this keeps up 2018 will be a mighty fine reading year.

What are you reading this month?