random thoughts

~ I finally arranged the books on my living room shelves by color. I like it.

books-by-color

~ Dark chocolate peanut butter cups. Oh my.

~ Things I don’t care about:

  1. DC or Marvel comics or the movies inspired by them.
  2. Game of Thrones
  3. the NFL

~ Am I the only one who hates to find that the “article” you clicked on is really a video? That annoys me to no end — especially when it’s autoplay.

~ I should not have chips in my house. Ever.

Random thoughts, random photos:

101514

080414

parischair

That’s it, y’all. Care to share any of your random thoughts?

“We listen every day to the voices of the culture around us…”

johnFrom John (St. Andrew’s Expositional Commentary) by R.C. Sproul:

All of us, even the most pious Christians among us, are overwhelmingly influenced by the cultural customs and conventions of the societies in which we live. It starts in school, where popularity means “being with it,” that is, being in line with the morality of the society, even if that morality includes things of which God does not approve. That’s what our innate struggle with sin is all about. We listen every day to the voices of the culture around us that tell us what’s politically correct and what isn’t, what is socially acceptable and what isn’t. Then, for a few minutes on Sunday morning, we hear the law of God. We know they don’t match up, but unless or until the Holy Spirit takes the law and pierces our souls with it and convicts us of sin, we don’t really pay attention to it.

SaveSave

august reading

My shoulder and neck issues are improving thanks to physical therapy and daily exercises, and that means that my sleep has improved. And that means that I haven’t read as much lately.

August:

  1. The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance  – Ben Sasse
  2. Moral Defense (Samantha Brinkman Book 2) – Marcia Clark
  3. Dot Journaling – A Practical Guide: How to Start and Keep the Planner, To-Do List, and Diary That’ll Actually Help You Get Your Life Together – Rachel Wilkerson Miller
  4. The Judgment of Richard Richter – Igor Štiks

The Sasse book (loaned to me by my son) was one in which I found myself often nodding in agreement. I’ve been bogged down in a couple of other books and picked up Marcia Clark’s as a quick diversion. I took a dot journaling class and read Miller’s book after that — it was a quick read that I’ll refer to again as I refine my bullet journaling. The Judgment of Richard Richter was a Kindle First book for August, so it was free. I’m pretty lukewarm about that one.

What are you reading and recommending these days?

signature

 

SaveSave

“How arrogant is that?”

johnFrom John (St. Andrew’s Expositional Commentary) by R.C. Sproul:

I’m sure you’ve seen the popular bumper sticker that says, “God said it; I believe it; that settles it.” How arrogant is that? We need a new bumper sticker, one that says: “God says it; that settles it.” It doesn’t matter whether I believe it. It’s settled long before my assent. If God Almighty opens His holy mouth and declares something, we don’t need another witness. It’s over.

 

SaveSave

“The question is…”

vanishing-american-adultFrom The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance by Ben Sasse:

…in this broken world of lawless souls, there will be control; there will be government. Order-seeking and security-seeking people, as well as those in search of power for their own purposes, will invariably seek to hold back the chaos of the world. The question is whether people will control themselves or submit to the control of another.

“…more like subjects than citizens.”

vanishing-american-adultFrom The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance by Ben Sasse:

Becoming truly literate is a choice. Reading done well is not a passive activity like sitting in front of a screen. It requires a degree of attention, engagement, and active questioning of which most of our children currently have a deficit. The core question is not whether you hold in your hand an old-fashioned paper book or a new electronic book, but rather that even when you read from a screen, you develop the self-discipline to ignore the temptation to check email or scores or social media every few minutes. Reading done well requires a forward-leaning brain. Our culture’s ever-present distractions–the obsessive appeals to immediacy (“What ‘news’ might I be missing?”)–conspire to blunt our curiosity and distract us from sustained thought. The relentless pull of the digital world, with its demands that our kids submit to the shiny and the immediate, threatens to make them not just less literate but also more like subjects than citizens.

“This is an active, not a passive, pursuit.”

vanishing-american-adultFrom The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance by Ben Sasse:

Unless you are dead or in the process of withering away in front of your screen the way so many millions of us do, there’s an imperative in your soul to unpack life and its endless mysteries. This is an active, not a passive, pursuit. For people who are alive, really alive, their brains are in motion. On the wall in the primary schooling area in our home hangs this apt observation by Ellen Parr: “The cure for boredom is curiosity. There is no cure for curiosity.”…Curiosity is the mental mortar for building strength and resilience.

Or, as my grandmother said, if you’re bored, you’re boring.

july reading

blue-books

It was another poor sleeping month which means it was a good reading month. 🙂

July:

  1. You Will Know Me – Megan Abbott
  2. A Gentleman in Moscow – Amor Towles
  3. Goodbye, Vitamin: A Novel – Rachel Khong
  4. Since We Fell – Dennis Lehane
  5. A Woman’s Wisdom: How the Book of Proverbs Speaks to Everything – Lydia Brownback
  6. Perfecting Ourselves to Death: The Pursuit of Excellence and the Perils of Perfectionism – Richard Winter
  7. Commentaries on Proverbs – Matthew Henry

My favorite this month (and will very likely make my top five for the year) was A Gentleman in Moscow. The other fiction books this month were just meh.

What are you reading & recommending these days?

 

“…we are not yet what we shall be…”

perfecting-ourselvesFrom Martin Luther, as quoted in Perfecting Ourselves to Death by Richard Winter:

This life, therefore, is not righteousness but growth in righteousness, not health but healing, not being but becoming, not rest but exercise; we are not yet what we shall be, but we are growing toward it; the process is not yet finished, but it is going on; this is not the end, but it is the road.

“…how to bid our dearest possessions adieu.”

gentleman-in-moscowFrom A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles:

‘Tis a funny thing, reflected the Count as he stood ready to abandon his suite. From the earliest age, we must learn to say good-bye to friends and family. We see our parents and siblings off at the station; we visit cousins, attend schools, join the regiment; we marry, or travel abroad. It is part of the human experience that we are constantly gripping a good fellow by the shoulders and wishing him well, taking comfort from the notion that we will hear word of him soon enough.

But experience is less likely to teach us how to bid our dearest possessions adieu. And if it were to? We wouldn’t welcome the education. For eventually, we come to hold our dearest possessions more closely than we hold our friends. We carry them from place to place, often at considerable expense and inconvenience; we dust and polish their surfaces and reprimand children for playing too roughly in their vicinity — all the while, allowing memories to invest them with greater and greater importance. This armoire, we are prone to recall, is the very one in which we hid as a boy; and it was these silver candelabra that lined our table on Christmas Eve; and it was with this handkerchief that she once dried her tears, et cetera, et cetera. until we imagine  that these carefully preserved possessions might give us genuine solace in the face of a lost companion.

But, of course, a thing is just a thing.

And so, slipping his sister’s scissors into his pocket, the Count looked once more at what heirlooms remained and then expunged them from his heartache forever.